Ms. Crawford’s Tea Cakes

Please read the entire recipe and instructions before beginning.

Serving size: 30-36 Tea Cakes

Ingredients: 

  • 2 sticks of unsalted butter at room temperature (that’s 16 tablespoons of butter)
  • 3 extra-large or jumbo eggs
  • 1/4 cup buttermilk
  • 2 cups of sugar
  • 4 cups of all-purpose flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/8 teaspoon of kosher salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/2 teaspoon lemon extract
  • 1/2 teaspoon almond extract
  • 1/2 teaspoon rum extract
  • Nutmeg to taste (I use 1 teaspoon of fresh nutmeg)

 

Directions: 

  • Sift flour, baking powder, baking soda, nutmeg, and salt in a separate bowl, and set aside.
  • Cream butter and sugar together using a stand mixer with the paddle attachment on
    medium high or hand mixer for 5 minutes.
    Scrape the bowl after 5 minutes and beat 1 additional minute.
  • Add eggs one at a time, beating well after each addition.
  • Add the extracts and mix well.
  • With the mixer on the slowest speed, add 1/3 of the flour mixture and a little of the
    buttermilk, and mix gently just to combine.
  • Repeat this process 2 times, beginning and ending with the flour mixture.
  • Remove from mixer, shape into a rectangle, and wrap in plastic wrap.
  • Chill for at least one hour to overnight. Overnight is best. If chilled overnight remove
    from the fridge 5 minutes before rolling out.
  • Pre heat oven to 400F
  • Line baking sheet with parchment paper.
  • Roll out dough to 1/4-inch thickness on a lightly floured surface.
  • Cut using a 3-3 1/2-inch
    cookie cutter, biscuit cutter, jelly jar, or drinking glass.
  • Work with half the dough at a time keeping the rest of the dough refrigerated.
  • Bake for 7-9 minutes
  • The tea cakes will look pale on top with slight browning on the edges.
  • Remove from oven and allow to rest on cookie sheet for 1 minute.
  • Move to a cooling rack to cool completely.
  • Store in airtight container once cooled.
  • Teacakes can be frozen.
  • Enjoy!
Jada Smith
Author: Jada Smith

17 Comments
  • Pingback:Why Tea Cakes Are a Recipe We Can't Lose - Black Restaurant Week
    Posted at 10:25h, 09 December Reply

    […] If no one in the family takes an interest in learning the recipe, share it with someone who does. Young people, if you don’t have anyone in your family to learn from, seek out an elder in your community who’s willing to teach. That’s how I came upon this recipe. […]

  • Myrtle
    Posted at 15:53h, 09 December Reply

    Wow that’s a lot of work

  • FRANCES M YOUNG
    Posted at 16:27h, 09 December Reply

    ty

  • Elaine Scott
    Posted at 18:34h, 09 December Reply

    I’m wondering if the other half of the dough can be frozen until ready for use…Thx

  • Mamie Hicks
    Posted at 21:04h, 09 December Reply

    Can’t wait to try your recipe. Thanks for sharing 😍

  • Karen Walker
    Posted at 07:28h, 10 December Reply

    This recipe sounds delicious

  • Julie Ta
    Posted at 08:14h, 10 December Reply

    Thanks for sharing! I have your same philosophy about recipes and am always happy to share when anyone asks. This was an interesting piece. I grew up in Dallas and still live here, and I love bakeries, cooking and baking, and exploring food and history, but I’ve never heard of these southern tea cakes. I’ll have to try making Ms. Crawford’s version soon.

  • April Pendleton
    Posted at 13:05h, 11 December Reply

    Oh my goodness Ms. Jada Smith, my cousins and I was just talking about how we hated that no one got our grandmother’s tea cake recipe before she went home to be with the Lord, and how hard it has been to find a good recipe. I am so grateful that you ran into someone who was willing to share a good tea cake recipe. I can’t wait to try it and share it with my cousins. Thank you for sharing. I look foreword to sharing Ms. Crawford’s recipe with the younger generation. I pray this recipe with never die. God Bless you and Ms. Crawford. Thank you again for sharing.

    • Black Restaurant Week
      Posted at 17:47h, 13 December Reply

      Thank you for sharing, April! We’re glad we can help connect people with great food and treasured recipes. Let us know how you and your family’s batches turn out!

  • Dolores Sigmon
    Posted at 20:22h, 12 December Reply

    Thank you for the information and recipe for tea cakes. I never knew much about their history but I do remember my grandma, who lived in Alabama, and a couple of my aunt made tea cakes when I was young. It’s always good to keep old recipes alive because if you don’t they will drop from history.

  • Cindy A Scott
    Posted at 17:02h, 15 December Reply

    Thank you so much for sharing the recipe. My grandma use to make them all the time and since she pass back in May of this year Tea Cake’s have been one thing of hers I want to keep going in the family.

  • Emil Åslund
    Posted at 10:08h, 18 December Reply

    Val Taylor on Instagram brought me here. I’m interested in learning new recipies and this looks like a good one. I already have most of the ingredients and just need to translate the measuring system to the one that I’m used to.

  • Janet Sharpe
    Posted at 20:45h, 19 December Reply

    Thank you so much for sharing this recipe. I have not had a good tea cake in many years! Look forward to trying. Thank you for the history as well.

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